For last year’s…

For last year’s words belong to last year’s language
And next year’s words await another voice.

– T.S. Eliot

Happy New Year!

 

220px-Thomas_Stearns_Eliot_by_Lady_Ottoline_Morrell_(1934)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

T. S. Eliot
 

T. S. Eliot, 1934

Born Thomas Stearns Eliot

September 26, 1888

St. Louis, Missouri

Died January 4, 1965 (aged 76)

London, England

Occupation Poet, dramatist, literary critic, and editor
Citizenship American by birth; British from 1927
Education A.B. in philosophy
Alma mater Harvard University

Merton College, Oxford

Period 1905–1965
Literary movement Modernism
Notable work(s) The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock (1915), The Waste Land (1922), Four Quartets (1944)
Notable award(s) Nobel Prize for Literature (1948), Order of Merit (1948)
Spouse(s) Vivienne Haigh-Wood (1915–1947); Esmé Valerie Fletcher (1957–death)
Children none
 
 

Thomas Stearns Eliot OM (September 26, 1888 – January 4, 1965) was a publisher, playwright, literary and social critic and “arguably the most important English-language poet of the 20th century”.[3] Although he was born an American, he moved to the United Kingdom in 1914 (at age 25) and was naturalised as a British subject in 1927 at age 39.

The poem that made his name, The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock—started in 1910 and published in Chicago in 1915—is seen as a masterpiece of the Modernist movement, and was followed by some of the best-known poems in the English language, including Gerontion (1920), The Waste Land (1922), The Hollow Men (1925), Ash Wednesday (1930), and Four Quartets (1945).[4] He is also known for his seven plays, particularly Murder in the Cathedral (1935). He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1948.[5]

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s